KHARON

Thanatology Review

Electronic Journal

Content

Volume 17

Number 1 · 2013

Original article

 MÁRIA TASNÁDI
MÁRIA TASNÁDI

tasnadimaria@yahoo.com

 KRISZTINA GABRIELLA SZABÓ
KRISZTINA GABRIELLA SZABÓ

krisztinagabriella.szabo@gmail.com

Self-exploration and posttraumatic growth (PTG) in patients diagnosed with cancer

Abstract · In this study we examined the relationship between posttraumatic growth (PTG) and self-exploration in patients diagnosed with cancer. According to the model of Tedeschi and Calhoun (2005), after traumatic events survivors are able to develop into a positive direction as well. We started from the basic assumption that self-exploration could promote development by creating opportunities for cognitive and emotional processing of the traumatic experience. Our aim was to examine the effect of self-exploration on the development of posttraumatic growth (PTG) in patients diagnosed with cancer. We assumed that a greater degree of PTG can be observed in patients participating in self-exploratory conversations compared to those who only received medical treatment. Participants were diagnosed with cancer for more than six months and less than five years (n=12 in the experimental group, n=11 in the control group). The self-exploratory intervention consisted of six individual conversations carried out within one month, allowing the participants of the experimental group to discuss the history of their disease, to express negative emotions and to formulate positive changes and experiences. To measure posttraumatic growth, we used a self-report questionnaire based on Tedeschi and Calhoun (1996). The questionnaire contains five subscales to measure psychological evolution in different areas of life. The results were processed using SPSS 16.0. Our results demonstrate PTG-development for members of the experimental group, especially in the subscales of relationship to others, new life opportunities and spiritual change.

 EMESE DONAUER
EMESE DONAUER

filozófus MA

donaueremese@gmail.com

If only living people existed... the Earth would be completely uninhabitable.

The possibility of survival after death in Marcel’s thanatological intersubjectivity

Abstract · The title may be - with no knowledge of Gabriel Marcel - somewhat deceptive in two ways. Reading the quotation, a vague idea can arise about undead zombies or something similar in the horror and sci-fi realm, while the subtitle hints at a religious approach. But Marcel speaks about death and the possibility of survival after death, avoiding all kinds of mystical approaches, as a philosopher of reflection and as a dramatist rather than a theologian. But how is it possible to survive after death? Why would the Earth be uninhabitable if only living people existed? The answer to these questions lies in Marcel's thanatological intersubjectivity: in a sincere, enriching, accepting and loving relationship that is capable of conceptually breaking the irreversibility of death. In this way it is possible that the loving bond will survive after death, the deceased and the living will continue to be present for each other; the enormous power of which is also reflected in the fact that the life of the survivor - despite death, mourning, pain, fear, bitterness and hardship - does not freeze and does not become worthless.